Articles

  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.

Welcome to our site!

Submitted by DMorgan on Wed, 03/01/2006 - 3:41pm.

 


Credit Goes to www.EliteFTS.comI'm going to take a moment to revisit principles that should be viewed as simplistic but are unfortunately still being overlooked and neglected by athletes and coaches. These facts should be viewed as cornerstones of a quality athletic development training system.

Submitted by DMorgan on Tue, 02/28/2006 - 8:22pm.

| Related Articles

 


One of the keys to designing an effective kettlebell program is to keep things simple. Learn more here and get some sample training programs that are sure to get you the size and strength you are looking for.  Credit goes to www.mikemahler.com

Submitted by DMorgan on Mon, 02/27/2006 - 4:44pm.

| Related Articles

 


Credit goes to www.higher-faster-sports.comHow important is a strong vertical jump to you? Well, even if you're not a basketball player, volleyball player, high-jumper, and you don't participate in a sport that requires leaping ability, you still might want to pay attention to it. Yes, even if you happened to be a sumo wrestler, whose sport requires staying glued to the ground - assessing your jumping ability would still have merit for you!

Submitted by DMorgan on Mon, 02/27/2006 - 10:18am.

| Related Articles

 


Credit goes to: www.Yourgolffitnesscoach.comThis is a letter from the Supertraining group moderated by Dr. Mel C. Siff at Yahoo.com posted by John Wilson.  This letter appeared as post #18,569.  I was so impressed with it that I had to post it here.  

Submitted by DMorgan on Mon, 02/27/2006 - 9:52am.

| Related Articles

 


Credit goes to www.alwyncosgrove.comIt is probably obvious to the readers of this site that the average trainee's workout program is absolute garbage. The question that has always bothered me is that despite improvements in technology, supplementation and world class sporting performance, the average training program (for athletes and non-athletes alike) has quite simply not progressed. I have come to the conclusion that there are several reasons for this, and once we can understand the reasons for the misinformation, we can begin to 'absorb what is useful and reject what is useless' (Bruce Lee). So for this article  I'd like to share a few with you –

Submitted by DMorgan on Thu, 02/23/2006 - 5:36pm.

| Related Articles

 


Credit goes to www.alywncosgrove.comApplying the principles of scientific training– I have come up with ten (and a half J ) training guidelines for the combat athlete that must be present to ensure competitive success. 1: Bodyweight before external resistanceMany athletes make the mistake of beginning a strength routine and going straight for the heavy weights. This usually ends up causing an injury. An athlete has no business using load if he/she cannot stabilize, control and move efficiently with only their bodyweight. So your strength program in the beginning stages may actually include no weights whatsoever. And it will work better and faster than a typical program that relies primarily on weights and machines in the beginning stages. In fact in my experience I’d suggest that some athletes cannot even work with their bodyweight so we may need to modify certain exercises. Do not rush to lift heavy loads – muscle recruitment and control are far more important than maximal strength for any athlete. Without control – the strength is useless.

Submitted by DMorgan on Thu, 02/23/2006 - 5:23pm.

| Related Articles

 


Credit goes to www.higher-faster-sports.com

Submitted by DMorgan on Tue, 02/21/2006 - 4:51pm.

| Related Articles

 


Credit goes to www.elitefts.com Almost a year ago, Matt Bash and I put our collective heads together and were thinking of different ways to approach our weak point in the deadlift; the lockout.  Basically nothing was helping and this gets very frustrating.  I felt that I had exhausted just about every possibility:  reverse hyperextensions, glute ham raises, pull-throughs, etc.  Everyone reading this article knows the drill, right?  So Matt and had an idea of deadlifting with chains.  This was right after we thought of 100 reasons why we shouldn’t train that day. I think this made a huge difference in my lockout, even after a few workouts.

Submitted by DMorgan on Mon, 02/20/2006 - 1:32pm.

| Related Articles

 


Credit goes to www.elitefts.comI have a passion for all aspects of strength and conditioning. What I love most is that I am blessed with knowledge and the ability to organize, relate, and help kids to understand. In doing so, I have used a trial and error format. This has never been more evident than with the format used for doing squats in the weight room.  Over the years, squats seemed to remain the most consistent as far as form and technique, until recently. I am always in search of the most effective way to get the most out the student-athlete in the weight room. This does not mean that I am jumping on the next bandwagon.  This means lots of research and practical application with my personal training, as well as with the students. This leads me to the title of this article,”Unlocking the Power of the Posterior Chain”. The key to this powerful lock is that of utilizing low box squats for 95% of squat movements in the weight room. Now many people may counter this by stating, “I am not training my kids to be powerlifters.”  Let me explain the reason behind this statement. I think that a majority of coaches of all sports would agree that one of the most important attributes of an athlete is in the hip flexor, glute, hamstring and spinal erector strength. This is what is often referred to as the posterior chain.  We feel that the box squat is the best option for all athletes, both male and female. There were many factors involved in this decision; time in each class, number of student-athletes, training age, biological age (from 7th grade to 12th grade). There were many more factors, but these factors weighed the most.

Submitted by DMorgan on Mon, 02/20/2006 - 11:19am.

| Related Articles