Kettlebell

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Credit goes to www.mikemahler.com Last time, I revealed some tips and programs to work up to mastering one-arm work with an 88lb kettlebell. Otherwise known as the “bulldog.” This time around I am going to discuss how to work up to using two 88lb kettlebells. Why bother? Well heavy training is how your increase Testosterone. Thus to incorporate some T workouts into your kettlebell program, you need to play with some real weights. 53lb bells and below are not going to cut it. 70lb bells are okay if you are under 185. However, if you are over 185 then get a pair of 88s now and get to work. If you are goals are to get as strong and muscular as possible with kettlebell training, you need to be able to play with the big bells. As effective as one-arm work is with one 88lb bell, it is not nearly as effective as double kettlebell work with two bulldogs. Your body has to work against twice as much weight and your hard work will be rewarded with massive gains in size and strength. This programs is also effective for working up to the 105lb bells otherwise known as the "bitch", I mean "beast" ;-) Lets get started.  Phase 1  

Submitted by DMorgan on Sun, 06/18/2006 - 4:14pm.

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Credit goes to www.mikemahler.comMany people tend to believe that light to moderate kettlebell training is ideal. 53lb bells for men and 26lb bells for women. I think this line of thinking is a great way to miss out on the benefits of heavy kettlebell training. Personally, the 53lb bells are worthless for me. They are not challenging at all and if I based my training on 53lb bells, I would not have the strength, size, endurance, and explosive power that I currently have. 

Submitted by DMorgan on Fri, 05/19/2006 - 8:06am.

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       Credit goes to www.kettlebellathletics.comMost sporting events revolve around your ability to create explosive movements over an extended period of time. This athletic quality is known as power-endurance. Training for power-endurance can be absolutely grueling, however, the athlete that possesses the greatest amount of power-endurance usually goes home the winner.

Submitted by DMorgan on Wed, 05/10/2006 - 8:42pm.

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www.mikemahler.comI get a ton of emails from people all of the time who want to work up to training with the 88lb kettlebells otherwise known as the “bulldogs.” Many people make the mistake of thinking that you are not ready for the 88lb bell if you cannot use the 88lb bell for the basic kettlebells drills such as: cleans, presses, windmills, and Turkish Get-ups. This is simply not true and a very provincial way to look at working up to the 88lb kettlebell. The way to work up to using 88lb bells for training is to actually use the 88lb kettlebell in your workouts. But you cannot even press the 70lb bell yet. How are you going to work with the bulldog? Simple; by starting with very basic exercises and building up to more advanced kettlebell exercises. This practical approach will build confidence, as you grow stronger. The right exercises will build strength, but more importantly will build confidence, which is extremely important when taming the 88lb bell and overlooked by most trainees. In this article I am going to take you step by step from very basic beginner bulldog workouts to advanced bulldog workouts with 1 88lb bell. I will save the fun of taming two “bulldogs” for another time and place. Let get started!

Submitted by DMorgan on Mon, 04/17/2006 - 8:28pm.

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Credit goes to www.mikemahler.comLouie Simmons is one of the best strength coaches in the business and a legend in the powerlifting community. He has produced some of the strongest men and women in the world with his innovative and unconventional methods. One the foundations for Louie’s “Westside” program is the emphasis on speed. Louie states that if you are fast he can make you strong. 

Submitted by DMorgan on Thu, 04/06/2006 - 8:16pm.

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Kettlebell training has taken the fitness world by storm. In just a few years, there are now thousands of people in the US that are benefiting from the brutal benefits of kettlebells. In addition, to everyday men and women, many athletes from a variety of sports now use kettlebells in their programs. Top K-1 fighter Bob Sapp recently stated that he uses kettlebell training to enhance cardio in a recent Muscle & Fitness interview. Welterweight UFC champion BJ Penn uses kettlebells to ramp up his muscular endurance for killer MMA battles. The benefits of kettlebell training having even reached Hollywood as actor Ed O'Neil well known for his role as Al Bundy on the hit comedy sitcom "Married With Children" (Imagine Al doing Kb snatches!) is a big fan of kettlebell training.   www.mikemahler.comMake no mistake about it kettlebell training is not another passing fad. The benefits of kettlebell training are undeniable which is precisely why many of the top strength coaches in the world such as Coach John Davies, Christian Thibaudeau, Steve Maxwell, and Wake forest strength coach Ethan Reeve have incorporated kettlebells into their athletes training regimens. In this article I am going to go over several ways to incorporate kettlebells into your training regimen. Lets get started!

Submitted by DMorgan on Sat, 04/01/2006 - 8:48am.

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Credit goes to www.Bodybuilding.com  Being a consumer in today's fitness/health market can be very overwhelming. Companies, salespeople, and even well-known athletes can be very convincing when it comes to buying certain product, whether it is the "most effective" new piece of equipment or a supplement that is "500% better" than all the competitors. Having been a part of the industry for some time now I believe I have been able to cut through the garbage of advertising and hype and hopefully can shed some light on good and over-hyped products. In this particular article I am going to discuss a new piece of training equipment that has been receiving a lot of attention as of late, kettlebells.

Submitted by DMorgan on Thu, 03/16/2006 - 8:32am.

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 Credit goes to www.Mikemahler.com Training with weighted clubs has been around for centuries. The famous Indian wrestler Gama used to train with clubs weighing over 80lbs and his strength was legendary. Recently, training with weighted clubs has become very popular due to the efforts of Coach Sonnon and RMAX.tv Productions. I was pretty skeptical about the benefits of Clubbell® training when I first heard about them. However, I was also really skeptical about kettlebell training as well a few years ago. Fortunately, I kept an open mind regarding kettlebells and now make a good chunk of my living doing kettlebell workshops around the US and overseas. Hundreds of people have benefited from my workshops and my articles and I receive a lot of positive feedback daily. Regardless, there is nothing wrong with being skeptical. Especially, in an industry full of gimmicks and false promises. However, being provincial is not a good thing in this business and will result in one missed opportunity after another. As a regular guy that may not be a big deal. However, as a strength coach that line of thinking is unacceptable. Athletes pay me to teach them how to get stronger, faster, and increase sports performance. It is my job to know about new developments and at the least be aware of anything that could give my clients an edge. After hearing about the benefits of Clubbells® from a lot of people that I trust and after getting a great deal of questions from my clients regarding Clubbells®, I decided to get Coach Sonnon's Clubbell® video to see what they were all about. Through his Clubbell® video, Coach Sonnon does a great job of teaching the variety of drills that can be done with Clubbells® and really nails the importance of safety and proper technique when executing Clubbell® drills. The only drawback of the tape, is that the background music is pretty lame, ha ha. As I watched Coach Sonnon do some of the drills, I immediately saw that Clubbells® work ranges off motion that are not possible or practical with kettlebells and dumbbells. The great deal of circular motions that can be done with Clubbells® looked like they would increase shoulder stability and increase shoulder flexibility. Having had some shoulder stability problems in the past and realizing that shoulder injuries are all too common among athletes, I saw the potential benefits of Clubbells® for increasing strength in the shoulders and for being used as a preventive measure against injuries. Also, due to the leverage involved in Clubbell® training, it became apparent that Clubbell® exercises increase grip and wrist strength in a different way than exercises such as wrist curls and farmers walks. The leverage factor with Clubbells® looked challenging. Finally, many of the exercises looked like a lot of fun and keeping training fun is extremely important for longevity.

Submitted by DMorgan on Mon, 03/13/2006 - 10:52am.

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"Kettlebell Complexes for Explosive Strength"

Submitted by DMorgan on Thu, 03/09/2006 - 8:22pm.

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One of the keys to designing an effective kettlebell program is to keep things simple. Learn more here and get some sample training programs that are sure to get you the size and strength you are looking for.  Credit goes to www.mikemahler.com

Submitted by DMorgan on Mon, 02/27/2006 - 4:44pm.

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