General Preparatory Classifications For Division I Football by Ryan Cidzik

  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kettlebe/public_html/enhancedfp.com/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.

Strength and conditioning/sports performance coaches are often faced with concerns about “individualizing” programs for their athletes. More times than not, it’s extremely difficult to make exact individual programs for every different athlete in the program. Although there are several different reasons for this, lack of time in the day is a large one (especially for the collegiate strength coach). Here at Northwestern State University (NSU), we developed a method for classifying our athletes to make their programs/training more individualized.

The yearly plan

Since we consider our approach to training to be based on the conjugate/concurrent eastern European methods, our classification of periods in the annual plan is different from the western classification (i.e. in-season and off-season). The first period is the preparatory period. We separate this into general preparatory 1 (January–March leading up to spring ball), general preparatory 2 (end of spring ball to May), specialized preparatory 1 (May–June), and specialized preparatory 2 (June–July).

The preparatory period is devoted to all-round physical training. The goal is to gradually prepare the athlete for competition and emphasize special physical preparation (SPP). The second period is the competitive period. The main goal during this phase is high athletic achievement allowing exercise selection to be more specific to the sport (3). We separate this into competitive 1 (spring football) and competitive 2 (in-season/fall football). It’s important to note that during the competitive 2 period, athletes will either train two, three, or four days a week (two day, starters; three day, intermediate playing time; and four day, redshirts/developmental).

The third period is the transitional or post-competitive period. We separate this into the transitional (post-spring ball) and post-competitive (post-fall season) phases. The athletes must remain active during this period. When the training year resumes, the athlete must begin on a higher level than they previously achieved (3). According to Volkov (1), “Sports training is based on three biological principles: the principle of overload, the principle of specificity, and the principle of reversibility of actions.”

Post-competitive

After the football season ended, our team took exactly one week off (week 1). Then, we followed a five-week general physical preparedness (GPP) program (weeks 2–6) similar to the “Coach X and 62’s GPP Program” (which is a must buy for any strength coach at any level). (It can be purchased at www.elitefts.com.) During weeks 2–3, the athletes trained with the sports performance staff here at NSU, and during weeks 4–6, the athletes were responsible for training themselves over Christmas break. Weeks 7–14 represented our eight-week general preparatory 1 program from January until the start of spring football practice (March).

Total classification

Athletes were initially classified into three categories based on our three main lifts. We utilize one-repetition maximums (1RMs) for the back squat (SQ), bench press (BP), and power clean (PC), our three main lifts. If you don’t power clean, you may substitute the deadlift or trap bar deadlift (as some of our other sports use these in place of the PC). We felt that these lifts reflected our program the best, and all of the special exercises we use are to increase the 1RMs of these three lifts.

We took each athletes body weight, and utilizing the Schwartz formula, found the Schwartz body weight coefficient. We then multiplied that coefficient by each athletes’ total (SQ+BP+PC = total). Some of our athletes didn’t have a max from the end of summer (those athletes who saw a significant amount of playing time during the football season—our “two day” and “three day” athletes). With those athletes, we used their exact body weight when they tested at the end of the summer and their total from the end of the summer (their most recent total). Since the rest of the athletes (those who didn’t play much during the football season—our “four day” athletes) tested on week 11 of the football season, we used their body weights and totals from that date. The point here is utilize each athlete’s most recent body weight and total and then use the Schwartz formula with those numbers. The Schwartz formula is as follows.

Schwartz formula in pounds. The Schwartz formula is for men. This version is with body weight conducted in pounds. To determine how strong the athletes are “pound-for-pound,” multiply each athlete’s coefficient (to the right of the body weight listed) by his or her total. The resulting factor is his or her Schwartz formula total. (BWT = body weight; SCHWARTZ = Schwartz formula)
 

BWT

SCHWARTZ

BWT

SCHWARTZ

BWT

SCHWARTZ

BWT

SCHWARTZ

BWT

SCHWARTZ

BWT

SCHWARTZ

150

.7207

192

.5878

233

.5426

274

.5220

315

.5002

356

.4821

151

.7165

193

.5954

234

.5418

275

.5214

316

.4998

357

.4817

152

.7124

194

.5935

235

.5411

276

5208

317

.4992

358

.4813

153

.7083

195

.5916

236

.5405

277

.5203

318

.4988

359

.4809

154

.7044

196

.5897

237

.5398

278

.5197

319

.4982

360

.4805

155

.7004

197

.5879

238

.5391

279

.5192

320

.4978

361

.4801

156

.6967

198

.5861

239

.5385

280

.5186

321

.4973

362

.4796

157

.6930

199

.5843

240

.5379

281

.5180

322

.4968

.

.

158

.6893

200

.5826

241

.5373

282

.5175

323

.4964

.

.

159

.6857

201

.5809

242

.5367

283

.5169

324

.4959

.

.

160

.6822

202

.5792

243

.5362

284

.5164

325

.4955

.

.

161

.6787

203

.5776

244

.5357

285

.5158

326

.4950

.

.

162

.6753

204

.5760

245

.5352

286

.5154

327

.4946

.

.

163

.6720

205

.5744

246

.5347

287

.5147

328

.4941

.

.

164

.6688

206

.5729

247

.5342

288

.5142

329

.4937

.

.

165

.6656

207

.5714

248

.5337

289

.5137

330

.4932

.

.

166

.6624

208

.5700

249

.5333

290

.5132

331

.4928

.

.

167

.6593

209

.5685

250

.5328

291

.5126

332

.4924

.

.

168

.6563

210

.5670

251

.5325

292

.5121

333

.4919

.

.

169

.6533

211

.5657

252

.5320

293

.5115

334

.4913

.

.

 
 

BWT

SCHWARTZ

BWT

SCHWARTZ

BWT

SCHWARTZ

BWT

SCHWARTZ

BWT

SCHWARTZ

 

 

170

.6504

212

.5643

253

.5316

294

.5109

335

.4909

.

.

171

.6475

213

.5630

254

.5312

295

.5104

336

.4905

 

 

172

.6447

214

.5617

255

.5308

296

.5098

337

.4901

 

 

173

.6420

215

.5604

256

.5304

297

.5094

338

.4896

 

 

174

.6392

216

.5592

257

.5300

298

.5088

339

.4891

 

 

175

.6365

217

.5580

258

.5296

299

.5083

340

.4887

 

 

176

.6339

218

.5568

259

.5292

300

.5077

341

.4883

 

 

177

.6313

219

.5556

260

.5289

301

.5072

342

.4878

 

 

178

.6288

220

..5545

261

.5284

302

.5067

343

.4874

 

 

179

.6262

221

.5535

262

.5281

303

.5062

344

.4870

 

 

180

.6238

222

.5524

263

.5276

304

.5057

345

.4866

 

 

181

.6214

223

.5514

264

.5273

305

.5053

346

.4862

 

 

182

.6190

224

.5504

265

.5268

306

.5047

347

.4858

 

 

183

.6167

225

.5994

266

5263

307

.5043

348

.4854

 

 

184

.6144

226

.5485

267

.5259

308

.5037

349

.4850

 

 

186

.6099

227

.5476

268

.5254

309

.5032

350

.4845

 

 

187

.6077

228

.5467

269

.5248

310

.5027

351

.4841

 

 

188

.6056

229

.5458

270

.5243

311

.5022

352

.4837

 

 

189

.6036

230

.5449

271

.5239

312

.5017

353

.4833

 

 

190

.6014

231

.5441

272

.5232

313

.5013

354

.4829

 

 

191

.5994

232

.5433

273

.5227

314

.5007

355

.4825

 

 


 

After determining how strong each individual athlete was “pound-for-pound,” we classified them into three categories: all-American, all-Conference, and team. The all-Americans are obviously your strongest or elite athletes pound-for-pound based on their total from the three lifts. The all-American total classification is any athlete over 620 (again taking their body weight, getting the Schwartz coefficient, and multiplying that by their total). The all-Conference athletes are those who are your intermediate lifters. The all-Conference total classification is any athlete between 570 and 619. Finally, the team members are your novice lifters pound-for-pound. The team total classification is any athlete below 570. For example, let’s say we have an athlete who weighs 230 lbs, squats 450 lbs, benches 400 lbs, and power cleans 250 lbs. His total would be 1,100 lbs.  We take 1,100 and multiply it by 0.5449 (the Schwartz coefficient). Our total is 599.4. So this athlete would be classified as all-Conference based on his total.

(Note: These numbers are based on the SQ, BP, and PC totals. If you utilize the deadlift/trap bar deadlift, you must increase these numbers.)

Individual lift classification

After you determine how strong the athletes are pound-for-pound based on their totals, it’s time to figure out how strong the athletes are pound-for-pound based on each individual lift (SQ, BP, and PC). We feel that this is by far the most important part of the classification because of the differences in lower, upper, and total body strength. For example, let’s say we have an athlete who weighs 230 lbs, has a 450 lb SQ, a 400 lb BP, and a 250 lb PC. He would be an all-Conference in the SQ, an all-American in the BP, and a team in the PC.

You’ll most likely have athletes who are a different classification in at least one category (i.e. SQ: all-American, BP: all-Conference, PC: all-Conference) and few athletes who are just one classification in all three categories (i.e. SQ: all-Conference, BP: all-Conference, PC: all-Conference). Hence, it’s important to not only classify the athletes based on their total (SQ+BP+PC), but also on each individual lift if you want to maximize results.

If we take the first example (230 lbs, 450 lb SQ, 400 lb BP, and 250 lb PC), here’s what it would look like: squat—245.2 (0.5449 x 450 lbs), bench—217.96 (0.5449 x 400 lbs), and power clean—136.22 (0.5449 x 250 lbs). So this athlete would be on three different programs during the week even though he’s classified as all-Conference for his total (1,100 total or 599.4). During the training week, he would do all-Conference squat workouts (Monday and Thursday), all-American bench workouts (Tuesday and Friday), and team power clean/deadlift workouts (Thursday)

(Note: There aren’t any set standards for ranking individual lifts based on body weight. Athletes should be based and/or ranked on the standards that you see fit as well as on the preparedness level of your athletes.)

Post-break

Before we get started with the all-American, all-Conference, and team programs, it’s important to note that each athlete must report back from Christmas break at a certain goal body weight. The first week that they’re back a preliminary testing is performed to ensure that each athlete was accountable enough over the break to train consistently. Our two and three day athletes (from the season who didn’t test from the end of the summer) must achieve a minimum of 85 percent of their 1RM in all three lifts (SQ, BP, and PC). The four day athletes (those who tested in week 11 of the football season) must achieve a minimum of 90 percent of their 1RM in all three lifts. This is because the four day athletes utilized a much more intense strength training regimen in-season than the two or three day athletes.

These minimum percentages (85–90 percent) should not represent their 1RM at that time. Most athletes should be able to do much more than the minimum if they were dedicated to training over the break. This not only shows us who trained and who didn’t over the break, but it also ensures that all athletes have a high enough level of absolute strength (5) to begin a more intense strength training regimen without risking injury.

All-American

According to Zatsiorsky (4), strength can be classified according to the methods of achieving maximal muscular tension in one of three ways—max effort (ME), repeated effort (RE), and dynamic effort (DE). Since the all-Americans are the advanced lifters, they may utilize special (ME) exercises more frequently than intermediate (all-Conference) or novice (team) athletes. All-Americans will rotate all ME exercises in a two-week wave and deload the third week. In the first week of a ME wave, athletes will work up to 92 percent for one rep (92/1), and in the second week, they’ll work up to 101/1. Since there must always be an overload in order to develop strength, the same 1RM achieved previously by the athlete is never used again. Every time we create an overload, the nervous system responds with renewed excitability (2).

According to the principle of progressive resistance, workloads must be above those normally encountered for muscle strength to increase (4). On “traditional DE days,” athletes will begin weeks 7–8 with RE work with free weights (FW) only. For weeks 9–13, they’ll begin true DE work. During weeks 9–11, athletes will attach chains (40–80 lbs total) when utilizing the SQ and BP DE exercises. During weeks 12–13, they will use bands on all DE work in the SQ and BP.  As for pulling, during weeks 7–9, the athletes will do deadlifts with chains. In weeks 10–11, they’ll do a hang clean (HC), and in weeks 12–13, they’ll do power cleans (PC). All assistance exercises were done in a three-week wave of isomiometric, submax eccentric, and dynamic. The basic all-American template is as follows:
  

All-American, 8-Week General Preparatory 1 Basic Template
                           
  Monday (LB) Tuesday (UB) Wednesday Thursday (LB) Friday (UB)

Week

Exercise

%

Method

Exercise

%

Method

off

Exercise

%

Method

Exercise

%

Method

7

Back SQ

85–90

ME Bench Press

85–90

ME

 

Power Clean

85–90

ME  

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

Box SQ (FW)

65

RE BP (FW)

65

RE

8

Special

92

ME Special

92

ME

 

DL (chains)

70

RE  

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

Clean Pull (chains)

65

DE  

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

Box SQ (FW)

70

RE BP (FW)

70

RE

9

Special

101

ME Special

101

ME

 

DL (chains)

75

RE  

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

Clean Pull (chains)

75

DE  

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

Box SQ (chains)

55

DE BP (chains)

60

DE

10

L.A.T.T.

55

Deload DB BP

55

Deload

 

Hang Clean

70

DE  

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

Box SQ (chains)

60

DE BP (chains)

60

DE

11

Special

92

ME Special

92

ME

 

Hang Clean

80

DE  

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

Box SQ (chains)

65

DE BP (chains)

60

DE

12

Special

101

ME Special

101

ME

 

Power Clean

80

DE  

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

Box SQ (bands)

50

DE BP (bands)

55

DE

13

L.A.T.T.

55

Deload BP Variation

55

Deload

 

Power Clean

90

ME  

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

Box SQ (bands)

53

DE BP (bands)

55

DE

14

Back Squat

101

ME Bench Press

101

ME

 

Power Clean

101

ME Team

 

 

 

(test)

 

  (test)

 

 

 

(test)

 

 

Comps

 

 

 

Assistance exercises: (1) isomiometric, 3 X 6 (6s-5s-4s-3s-2s-1s); (2) submax eccentric, 3 X 8 (5s down); (3) dynamic, 3 X 10 (normal/controlled speed)

 
 

All-Conference

Since all-Conference athletes are your intermediate level lifters, they can do special exercises more frequently than team athletes but less than all-Americans. All the ME waves for all-Conference athletes will be in three weeks instead of two weeks as with the all-Americans. For the first week (of a ME wave), they’ll work up to a 5RM (approximately 85 percent), and for the second week, they’ll work up to a 3RM (approximately 92 percent). In the third week, they’ll do a 1RM (approximately 101 percent).

This three week wave enhances the time that the athletes are under tension for special exercises, and it also gives them an extra week for their bodies to learn and adapt to the ME movement. Similar to the extra ME work, the all-Conference athletes will spend more time doing RE work than the all-Americans. They’ll also spend more time doing deadlifts and true PC. However, like the all-Americans, their assistance wave is the same (isomiometric, submax eccentric, and dynamic). The basic all-Conference template is as follows:
 

 

All-Conference, 8-Week General Preparatory 1 Basic Template
                           
  Monday (LB) Tuesday (UB) Wednesday Thursday (LB) Friday (UB)
Week Exercise

%

Method Exercise

%

Method

off

Exercise

%

Method Exercise

%

Method

7

Back SQ

85–90

ME

Bench Press

85–90

ME

  Power Clean

85–90

ME

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Box SQ (FW)

65

RE

BP (FW)

65

RE

8

Special

85

ME

Special

85

ME

  DL 

70

RE

 

 

 

 

(5RM)

 

 

(5RM)

 

 

  Clean Pull

65

DE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Box SQ (FW)

70

RE

BP (FW)

70

RE

9

Special

92

ME

Special

92

ME

  DL 

75

RE

 

 

 

 

(3RM)

 

 

(3RM)

 

 

  Clean Pull

75

DE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Box SQ (FW)

70

RE

BP (FW)

70

RE

10

Special

101

ME

Special

101

ME

  DL 

85

RE

 

 

 

 

(1RM)

 

 

(1RM)

 

 

  Clean Pull

80

DE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Box SQ (chains)

65

RE

BP (chains)

65

RE

11

L.A.T.T.

55

Deload

DB BP

55

Deload

  Power Clean

70

DE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Box SQ (chains)

70

RE

BP (chains)

70

RE

12

Special

92

ME

Special

92

ME

  Power Clean

80

DE

 

 

 

 

(3RM)

 

 

(3RM)

 

 

  Box SQ (chains)

75

RE

BP (chains)

75

RE

13

Special

101

ME

Special

101

ME

  Power Clean

90

ME

 

 

 

 

(1RM)

 

 

(1RM)

 

 

  Box SQ (FW)

65

DE

BP (FW)

65

DE

14

Back Squat

101

ME

Bench Press

101

ME

  Power Clean

101

ME

Team

 

 

 

(test)

 

  (test)  

 

  (test)

 

  Comps

 

 
 

Assistance exercises: (1) isomiometric, 3 X 6 (6s-5s-4s-3s-2s-1s); (2) submax eccentric, 3 X 8 (5s down); (3) dynamic, 3 X 10 (normal/controlled speed)

 

Team

Since team athletes are your novice lifters and need to learn the basics first, special exercises are limited. Much time is spent with the classical lifts for the team lifters because they must neurologically learn and excel at the movements before they’re ready for special exercises. Monday is the regular back squat with 40 lbs of chains (20 lbs on each side), and Tuesday is the regular bench press with the same amount of chains. On Thursday, the team athletes perform the deadlift from weeks 8–12 and then PC on week 13 before they test. Team athletes will also incorporate submax eccentric work from weeks 7–10 on Thursdays (box squat) and Fridays (bench press). For weeks 11–13, they’ll still box squat and bench but with “dynamic” (normal speed) movements (no submax eccentric work). The assistance exercises are done in a four-week wave, adding an extra week to adapt unlike the all-American and all-Conference athletes. The basic team template is as follows:
 

Team, 8-Week General Preparatory 1 Basic Template
                           
  Monday(LB) Tuesday (UB) Wednesday Thursday(LB) Friday (UB)

Week

Exercise

%

Method Exercise

%

Method

off

Exercise % Method Exercise % Method

7

Back SQ

85–90

ME Bench Press

85–90

ME

  Power Clean

85–90

ME

   

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

  Box SQ-FW

 

 

BP-FW  

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

  (submax ecc)

55

RE

(submax ecc) 55

RE

8

SQ (chains)

50

RE BP (chains)

50

RE

  DL 

70

RE

   

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

  Clean Pull

65

DE

   

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

  Box SQ-FW

 

 

BP-FW  

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

  (submax ecc)

60

RE

(submax ecc) 60

RE

9

SQ (chains)

60

RE BP (chains)

60

RE

  DL 

75

RE

   

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

  Clean Pull

70

DE

   

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

  Box SQ-FW

 

 

BP-FW  

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

  (submax ecc)

65

RE

(submax ecc) 65

RE

10

SQ (chains)

70

RE BP (chains)

70

RE

  DL 

85

RE

   

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

  Clean Pull

75

DE

   

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

  Box SQ-FW

 

 

BP-FW  

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

  (submax ecc)

70

RE

(submax ecc) 70

RE

11

SQ (chains)

80

RE BP (chains)

80

RE

  DL 

80

RE

   

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

  Clean Pull

80

DE

   

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

  Box SQ (FW)

65

RE

BP (FW) 65

RE

12

L.A.T.T.

55

Deload DB BP

55

Deload

  DL 

85

RE

   

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

  Clean Pull

85

DE

   

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

  Box SQ (FW)

70

RE

BP (FW) 70

RE

13

SQ

92

ME BP

92

ME

  Power Clean

90

ME

   

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

  Box SQ (FW)

80

RE

BP (FW) 80

RE

14

Back Squat

101

ME Bench Press

101

ME

  Power Clean

101

ME

Team  

 

 

(test)

 

  (test)  

 

  (test)     Comps    
 

Assistance exercises: (1) isomiometric, 3 X 6 (6s-5s-4s-3s-2s-1s); (2) submax eccentric, 3 X 8 (5s down); (3) dynamic, 3 X 10 (normal/controlled speed); (4) dynamic, 3 X 12

 
 

Special thanks to Ben Larson (NSU Assistant Director of Sports Performance), Brian Hill (NSU Sports Performance Assistant), and Mike Wendel (NSU Sports Performance Assistant) for all of their help and input with the program.

References

1. Volkov N (1974) The Logic of Sports Training. Legkaya Atletika 10: 22–23. Translated and cited in the Yessis Review of Soviet Physical Education and Sports (now the Soviet Sports Review) (1975) 10(2).

2. Yessis M (1981) The Key to Strength Development: Variety. National Strength and Conditioning Association Journal 3: 32–34.

3. Yessis M (1981) The Soviet Sports Training System—The Yearly Cycle. National Strength and Conditioning Association Journal; Trends in Soviet Strength Conditioning 3: 20–23.

4. Zatsiorsky VM (1992) Intensity of Strength Training Facts and Theory: Russian and Eastern European Approach. National Strength and Conditioning Association Journal 14(5): 46–57.

5. Zatsiorsky VM (1995) Science and Practice of Strength Training. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

Ryan Cidzik is the strength and conditioning coordinator for Northwestern State University in Louisiana. He is state chairman of the American Powerlifting Association and oversees all competitions in Louisiana and Alabama. Cidzik also has worked at Louisiana Tech and served as the primary strength and conditioning consultant for NFL Europe in 2004 before being appointed as the league’s first strength and conditioning coordinator.

Elite Fitness Systems strives to be a recognized leader in the strength training industry by providing the highest quality strength training products and services while providing the highest level of customer service in the industry. For the best training equipment, information, and accessories, visit us at www.EliteFTS.com.









Copyright© 2007 Elite Fitness Systems. All rights reserved. 
You may reproduce this article by including this copyright
and, if reproducing it electronically, including a link to
www.Elitefts.com.

Submitted by DMorgan on Fri, 03/02/2007 - 10:58am.

| Related Articles