Nutrition

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We've heard it before: this supplement or that supplement stands to be the next creatine. Only it never does pan out to be the next creatine. Worse, whatever it was that initially prompted such lofty comparisons usually gets dumped to the back of history's medicine cabinet, forgotten and eventually discarded.

Submitted by DMorgan on Fri, 05/25/2007 - 2:38pm.

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It's a classic case of guilt by association. Average people, including many of your athletes and their parents, have no easy way to wade through media hype surrounding steroids and other illegal performance enhancers. Every week seems to bring new accusations and innuendo about who's doing what, leaving the impression that all performance-enhancing substances are the same and anything beyond milk is suspect.

Submitted by DMorgan on Mon, 05/21/2007 - 10:00am.

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  Credit to www.medscape.com March 14, 2007 — Fiber in the diet can reduce C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, a new study suggests. Writing in the March 12 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, Dana King, MD, and colleagues from the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston report that both a high-fiber diet, as well as a fiber-supplemented diet, significantly — if modestly — reduced baseline CRP levels during a 3-week period.

Submitted by DMorgan on Fri, 03/30/2007 - 10:12pm.

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        The purpose of the Carbohydrate Manifesto series is to shed some light on the topic of carbohydrates and how they play a major role in the powerlifter’s meal plan. The carbohydrate is the most hotly debated macronutrient. Dieticians and scientists around the world are always looking for new research about carbohydrates and how they affect our health and athletic performance. Carbohydrates could be known as the mystery macronutrient. Some dieticians praise them as being the best nutrient under the sun, while others hold them responsible for the majority of disease and obesity in the United States. Who is right?

Submitted by DMorgan on Tue, 12/19/2006 - 1:06am.

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Credit to www.elitefts.com and www.maxcondition.com There’s a window of opportunity around workout time where protein consumption enhances muscle protein synthesis above normal levels (in addition to the protein synthesizing effects of resistance training). In this section, we will examine what various researchers have found regarding protein timing. Some authorities have reported that protein timing is just as important as total protein intake. (My note: I doubt that.) A session of heavy resistance training increases muscle protein synthetic rates rapidly. MPS rates return close to baseline at approximately 36 hours. Some studies have even suggested that protein synthesis rates stay elevated for up to 48 hours after a heavy resistance training session. If foods containing proteins or amino acids are delivered either immediately before exercise or in the post-exercise period then the rise is greater. If insufficient supplies of amino acids are provided, protein breakdown will exceed protein synthesis and there will be no net accretion of protein. A study conducted by Tipton showed the delivery of amino acids to be significantly greater during exercise when consumed pre-workout than post-workout (Tipton 2001). The study was designed to determine whether consumption of an oral essential amino acid, carbohydrate supplement (EAC) before exercise results in a greater anabolic response than supplementation after resistance exercise.

Submitted by DMorgan on Mon, 09/18/2006 - 11:17pm.

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Are you more likely to be able to decipher ancient Greek texts than figure out how to construct a diet containing 30% protein, 50% carbohydrate, and 20% fat?  Well then check out the following resources.

Submitted by DMorgan on Sat, 07/22/2006 - 4:39pm.

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Credit Goes to www.elitefts.comFrom Chapter 4: Protein Requirements, part 1 “Over the past two to three decades, there has been an almost never-ending debate regarding human requirements for protein. Without going into the debate’s history, the basic argument has come down to whether or not athletes need more protein than average, sedentary individuals. Mainstream nutrition types, especially registered dietitians (RDs), have either maintained that athletes don't need any excess protein or that they already get more than enough. On the other hand, athletes and some sports nutritionists, who are often dismissed as quacks, maintain that athletes do in fact need more protein to support their heavy training. In the research world, this argument persists. In this chapter, we will look at both sides of the argument, provide background data for both cases, and offer our general recommendations. Protein turnover and nitrogen balance

Submitted by DMorgan on Fri, 05/05/2006 - 11:40pm.

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Credit goes to www.elitefts.comYes, it’s finally here! You now have the final part in this three part series on how to go up a weight class. All the while making sure you don’t look like you have been on a serious diet of hot dogs and marshmallows. By the time you finish this article you will know the top 25 ways to put on solid muscle so that going up your weight class is a little more scientifically laid out than raiding your local “All you Can Eat” buffet a couple times a week. In the final installation of this series, I will discuss the last 9 tips to make sure that your venture of going up a weight class was a success, not a higher cholesterol rating.

Submitted by DMorgan on Fri, 04/21/2006 - 9:08pm.

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Reprinted from www.elitefts.com In the first part of this series I discussed 8 top ways to pack on mass when going up a weight class. In the second part of this three part series I will continue with the next 8 tips to take you to success. Most people think that it is easy to pack on weight and they are right, if putting on fat weight is your goal. The purpose of this series is to make sure that the weight that you do put on is solid muscle, and not just an extra layer of fat around your hips and waist. Putting on quality weight that will lead to a bigger total is our objective. There are many misconceptions on how to properly go up to the next weight class. What we have to remember as powerlifters is that by going up a class we have to produce a total that is competitive at that new class. What was elite at your old class won’t pull you through in the next division up. With this in mind what we must realize here is that we have to put on as much lean muscle tissue as possible while minimizing any fat gain. This can only be done through a well planned out nutritional and supplementation program. Here are the next 8 tips to pack it on!

Submitted by DMorgan on Fri, 04/21/2006 - 8:59pm.

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Reprinted from www.bodybuilding.comThe glycemic index is everywhere. Recent magazine articles, radio advertisements, talk shows and well publicized books are making great claims from its use. Low glycemic meals are being touted as an aid in weight loss as well as an effective manager of diabetes and possibly relevant to the prevention of heart disease.

Submitted by DMorgan on Wed, 04/12/2006 - 8:19pm.

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